Followup to Planning Outdoor Adventures

Sometimes even the best of planning isn’t enough. That’s when it really hits home – the adventure isn’t just the hidden trail, the scenic river, the snowy slope. It’s the whole package, from start to finish.

I watched a snippet of Steve Fisher’s “Halo Effect” at the Reel Paddling Film Festival last week. In essence, the film isn’t about the perfect moment “when the stars align…” but about the adventure that sometimes happens along the way, when “…in the blink of an eye… things go horribly wrong.”

We were heading on a 10-hour road trip west towards a friend’s cabin for a week of hiking, biking and paddling one summer. Our friend suggested a gravel road short cut up over a low mountain pass to save a couple of hours drive. Just before we reached the pass – in the middle of nowhere – my guy pulls over.

“Think we’ve got a flat,” he mumbles as he opens the door.

“Yup,” I hear as he walks to the rear driver’s tire. I open the passenger door to find out that it’s not just one flat, not two, but three flat tires. We’ve seen no other vehicles since we left pavement. There is no cell reception. We don’t have an emergency messenger – yet. How many spares do you normally carry? Sh…oot.

Unplanned adventure isn't wasting time! (Photo:M.Kopp)

From spiked roads to vehicle malfunctions to weather woes – outdoor adventures include the journey it takes to get there.

When things go wrong:

  • Don’t panic, come up with a rational plan of action.
  • Record the moment, it will make for entertaining conversation later on.   
  • Be prepared for emergencies – always pack essentials (they work front or backcountry).
  • Just remember, “adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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