Awe-Inspiring Ice Caves From Around the World

Ice Caves Around the World

Ice caves inspire wonder and awe. No matter how many you’ve seen, there are more to be admired. We wish we could include a hundred pics, but here’s about a dozen best photos of ice caves around the world.

 

Ice Caves at Mount Cook National Park, New Zealand

Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

Moiry Glacier, Switzerland

Lanjökull Glacier, Iceland

Ice Caves in Werfen, Austria

Jökulsárlón Glacier, Iceland

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Icecave season is starting soon! #iceland #icecave #winter

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Eiskogelhöhle Cave Werfenweng, Austria

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A cave scientist rappels over a giant ice flow and descends into a huge ice filled chamber inside Eiskögel höhle near Werfenweng in Austria. Mountain regions respond sensitively to climate change. Taking advantage of Alpine caves, a team of scientists led by Swiss Paleoclimatologist Dr. Marc Luetscher (@paleo_marc) from the Swiss Institute for Speleology and Karst Studies (SISKA), is working to understand how permafrost has evolved through time. Ice caves form through a combination of snow intrusion and/or congelation of water infiltrating a karst system. Often up to several centuries old, the climate record of this ice remains largely under-studied. Today we are also able to tell if a cave was an ice cave in the past. This is achieved by looking for cryogenic cave calcites. These form when water enters a cave, and freezes and turns to ice. In this process, the water becomes progressively enriched in ions to the point that it becomes super-saturated and precipitates calcite. @natgeocreative #icecave #cave #science #climatechange #underground #Austria #climate #research #ice #eiskogelhöhle @uibk.climate

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Vernadsky Research Base, Antarctica

Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland

Ice Caves in Whistler, Canada

Halle der Circe in Eiskogelhöhle, Austria

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In freezing cold temperatures, an explorer is dwarfed by a giant ice formation inside the Halle der Circe in Eiskogelhöhle, Austria. Ice caves like these are common in the Austrian Alps but are seriously under stress due to climate change. Mountain regions respond sensitively to climate change. Taking advantage of Alpine caves, a team of scientists led by Swiss Paleoclimatologist Dr. Marc Luetscher (@paleo_marc) from the Swiss Institute for Speleology and Karst Studies (SISKA), is working to understand how permafrost has evolved through time. Ice caves form through a combination of snow intrusion and/or congelation of water infiltrating a karst system. Often up to several centuries old, the climate record of this ice remains largely under-studied. Today we are also able to tell if a cave was an ice cave in the past. This is achieved by looking for cryogenic cave calcites. These form when water enters a cave, and freezes and turns to ice. In this process, the water becomes progressively enriched in ions to the point that it becomes super-saturated and precipitates calcite. @natgeocreative #icecave #cave #science #climatechange #underground #Austria #climate #research #ice #eiskogelhöhle

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Langjökull Glacier Chapel, Iceland

Wedding in Langjökull Glacier, Iceland

Share Your Ice Cave Pics

Have you visited an ice cave? Have some cool pics? Please share them with us via hashtag #brooksrangemountaineering on Instagram.

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